Wild Soul by Dr Elisa Robyn

NOTE: If you enjoy this article please join me on my website https://elisarobyn.com/ to read any future blogs.

I am so grateful for that time on markhusson.com but will now be using my own site for article, podcasts and classes.


We all have hidden soulful obsessions that we at times fight to deny and at times surrender to, giving them free rein.  At times we wonder if the battle between wildness and safety will tear us apart. We might try to choose safety, but a true wild heart will not be denied. It entices and seduces us, daring us to admit our longing to follow the haunting song of deep yearning. 

We are afraid that if we follow that siren song into the deep fire we will merge with the core of blackness that ignites the blue flame. We try to force ourselves to enjoy only the warmth of the orange glow, but find the deeper center too tantalizing, too persuasive to resist. Some people turn their back and never answer, but I need to heed the call. 

What is that haunting refrain that wakes me in the dark and creeps into the edges of my dreams, beckoning me into the unknown? At times I am afraid that I will awake and find that I have chosen to follow where it leads. Other times I am afraid that I have turned away and the song will abandon me and find another dancer. 

Why does the unpredictability of the northern lights dance rythmically with the longing in my heart? I have never seen the Scottish Moors, but somehow just those words call to me. What am I looking for?

Our inner passion wraps around us like a warm wind, caressing our skin. Kiss me here we cry, but the wind laughs and moves on responding to no master. So we look outward, to another person hoping to see the reflection of our passion in their eyes. Or perhaps a reflection of our true worth. And if we see a glimmer of what we hope for we open our hearts and believe that we have found a soul mate, someone who will bring our passion into an earthly form. We forget our inner secret, that our passion lives deep within us and can never be found in another person.

Perhaps this is the reason we so badly want to fall in love. We are looking for a sense of permanence, someone we can hang on to who supplants the call of our wildness. We substitute the love of another for the love of ourselves, hoping that the urges to run knee-deep in the pounding surf will fade away.

My father told me I would outgrow this yearning, though he never outgrew his. I am sure he worried that I would follow these voices into dangerous unknown places. He relentlessly hoped in vain that I would choose safety over the wild pounding heartbeat of my soul. And yet he knew that as his daughter I would follow in his footsteps and hang on to my waywardness.

Even though he died over 30 years ago I can still feel his spirit around me, cheering me on. I have to wonder if he is vicariously enjoying my courageous adventures, rejoicing in the fact that I did not heed his warnings so very long ago. Because I think these are my gifts, the ability to listen to the song of the sirens and not crash into the rocks, and to share that gift with others, teaching them to sail towards their passion between the dangers of Scylla and Charybdis.  

The reward is great, even though our hearts might break and our souls wander untethered. It is this true adventure of life heals us. People will warn you to stay close to shore where you will be safe. But just like ships, our hearts and souls are meant to sail in tempestuous waters and answer to wild winds.  

elisa_blog_lg.jpg

Dr. Elisa Robyn, a modern-day Renaissance educator and leader, is the author of The Way of the Well, a spiritual romance, and Pirate Wisdom, lessons in leadership. Her eclectic career positions include geologist, Dean of Arts and Sciences, Vice President of Academic Affairs, Futurist, and Innovative Mojo Coach. Currently, Elisa is an executive director at Regis University. She holds a Masters degree from the University of California, Santa Barbara, and a Ph.D. from the University of Colorado, Boulder. Her most current writings can be found at https://www.ElisaRobyn.com

Elisa Robyn

Dr. Elisa Robyn, a modern-day Renaissance educator and leader, is the author of The Way of the Well, a spiritual romance, and Pirate Wisdom, lessons in leadership. Her eclectic career positions include geologist, Dean of Arts and Sciences, Vice President of Academic Affairs, Futurist, and Innovative Mojo Coach. Currently, Elisa is an executive director at Regis University. She holds a Masters degree from the University of California, Santa Barbara, and a Ph.D. from the University of Colorado, Boulder.

To Go or Not To Go G. Brian Benson

I just had an audition today for a play that I almost didn’t go to. For some reason…I wasn’t feeling my normal confident self and began to be very fearful…so much so that It almost kept me home. It was one of those times that no matter how many pep talks I gave myself or looking back with confidence from all of my past successes made any difference. But…deep down I knew if I didn’t show up to the audition that I would have much more disappointment and regret inside of me…than if I went and performed poorly because I was nervous or not confident this particular day. I then made a decision to just show up authentically…in a vulnerable state and all. Whether I get the part or not was insignificant compared to stepping into my fears. I certainly didn’t expect them to show up this morning but they did and I eventually met them head on. 

Because I took that step I can add this experience to my foundation that is becoming more and more solid each and every day. Had I not showed up…my foundation wouldn’t be as strong and I would have had to live with the regret of not showing up for something that took only 5 short minutes of my life….but will no doubt positively reverberate for years to come.

What is your “to go or not to go” situation? 

I am an Advisor at 12Listen and look forward to helping guide you through problems big and small. 

Sincerely,
Brian

Am I going where the weather suits my clothes? by Dr Elisa Robyn

In Kabbalah joy and grief are inextricably intertwined. Our rituals teach us that both are parts I have this odd psychic gift that allows me to sense a major life change six months to a year in advance. It has to do with my clothing. One day I find that I hate half the things in my closet, outfits that I liked perfectly well yesterday. Or perhaps the message comes while out shopping with friends and suddenly I want clothing that does not match my job or my lifestyle. This is one way that I receive a clear message that life is about to change long before there is any plan, awareness, or decision on my part.  

I am in the middle of such a change, wondering what my new aesthetic is telling me. I have switched from a casual and perhaps slightly edgy professional look into an edgy sensual professional look. I am not actually sure that is a look, but if my wardrobe is any indication, I am creating it, starting with dark blue streaks in my long dark hair, that seem to slide under most people's visual radar.

In the past these shifts have signaled a new higher level job requiring a more pulled together look. Or perhaps a job in a new culture that had a bit more serious cultural norm.  But not this time. This shift is a simultaneously more intense and more liberating. It is not only my clothes that seem at odds with my life. I find myself humming that old song "going where the weather suits my clothes" and adding on shoes, furniture, hair, laughter, passions, style and lifestyle. Even my walk and signature have shifted slightly. It seems that my body has some secret knowledge it is not sharing. I can only guess at the future based on what I see in the mirror.

Interestingly, this is how I learn languages. First my body starts to move like a native speaker, then the accent flows from my mouth, and finally the words take root in my mind. It is also the way I read as an empath. Energy flows through me aligning my awareness with people and places and information. The messages journey upwards and come out of my mouth, often bypassing my mind as if my body is reticent to have my mind intrude on the experience and act as a judge rather than an honest translator.

So life is about to change, though I have no idea how. Will I run away to sea and join a pirate crew? My clothes would fit in well. Or perhaps I am destined to meet a sensual lover, who could of course be a pirate, who will help me explore my new sense of self. There is always the chance that my art will start to sell and I will need clothing that sets me apart from the crowd. 

Better yet, it is possible that I am coming into my own and dropping my disguises after years of hiding behind a persona that fit in to my career. Perhaps my new self will create a career and life that matches my soul, one that does not require me to turn down my own sound track. I know it is possible be fully alive, passionately guided by my own definition of professional edgy sensuality. Now let me change clothes and head to that horizon. 

elisa_blog_lg.jpg

Dr. Elisa Robyn, a modern-day Renaissance educator and leader, is the author of The Way of the Well, a spiritual romance, and Pirate Wisdom, lessons in leadership. Her eclectic career positions include geologist, Dean of Arts and Sciences, Vice President of Academic Affairs, Futurist, and Innovative Mojo Coach. Currently, Elisa is an executive director at Regis University. She holds a Masters degree from the University of California, Santa Barbara, and a Ph.D. from the University of Colorado, Boulder. Her most current writings can be found at https://www.ElisaRobyn.com

Elisa Robyn

Dr. Elisa Robyn, a modern-day Renaissance educator and leader, is the author of The Way of the Well, a spiritual romance, and Pirate Wisdom, lessons in leadership. Her eclectic career positions include geologist, Dean of Arts and Sciences, Vice President of Academic Affairs, Futurist, and Innovative Mojo Coach. Currently, Elisa is an executive director at Regis University. She holds a Masters degree from the University of California, Santa Barbara, and a Ph.D. from the University of Colorado, Boulder.