Scaring Myself Wild by Dr. Elisa Robyn

adventure1.jpg

Life and I have been dancing to a fugue in E minor, repeating themes rising to haunt me and then retreating into darkness. And the darkness calls to me, reminding how great longing challenges us to surrender to the path before us. 

I have to admit I wondered if I could feel that depth of longing again, the craving that led me to spiritual adventures deep in wild forests. At some point a vacuum cleaner entered my soul and emptied it of any sense of beauty or love. Could I find space in the tumble and tangle of daily life to once again yearn so deeply I thought I would tear in two? Or had I left that behind as I lifted the responsibilities of jobs and family and commitments and grief? 

 Everyone told me that nature abhors a void and that time would fill the emptiness. But nature and time seemed to be busy elsewhere. It was an old friend who told me that I need to find my Mojo and, as the Mad Hatter said to Alice, my “muchness.” He told me his memory of me with a pack on my back, looking over my shoulder at him saying “come on, we can do this” even though we both knew I was afraid. He remembered my wildness, even if I did not. 

For the past several months, wildness has been inserting itself in such odd places. While lifting weights or training for a ½ marathon I can see a world full of options before me. While creating fiber art or writing an article, I remember that I can choose to leave or to stay. When connecting with old friends it is clear that I can run away or embrace. Wildness means I can move toward something as soon as I move away from illusions and scars that never really defined me.

All that sounded amazing, and challenging, and terrifying. And honestly, emptiness was getting boring, and filling me with the fear that I would never be full of love and laughter and light and wonder. I had been sailing my life-ship with no navigational information. All I could do was steer away from the danger buoys and warning lights. It seemed like a safe and perhaps even wise choice, but I was headed nowhere and steering based on my fears.

My family often told me I would "out-grow" my craving for life and my longing for the touch of G-d on my heart. They said the fire that drove me would be tamed and my wildness would be trimmed, and I would be safe so they would not be frightened. But honestly, wildness is still my favorite color.

So I changed my sailing plan, and steered towards the warnings lights and all that I feared. I breathed in the wind and danced to the rhythm of the waves, and followed my fears where ever they led. My soul began to fill with wonder and desire and passion and laughter. My adventures started so very small, but quickly expanded. My soul not only filled, but also expanded, as I sailed into adventure and away from the deceptively safe shore. 

And, without fan-fare or fuss, there it was, that deep craving in my heart that called and chanted and sang and drummed and danced and whispered. That still small voice invited me back on the journey, without any rules, codicils or addendums. Just a door that opened before me, a wind that blew through me, a scent that captivated me, and a sense that this journey has been waiting for me all along. And I am beyond delighted.    

Amazingly, I discovered a new type of navigational tool…scaring myself wild. I highly recommend it. 

elisa_blog_lg.jpg

Dr. Elisa Robyn, a modern-day Renaissance educator and leader, is the author of The Way of the Well, a spiritual romance, and Pirate Wisdom, lessons in leadership. Her eclectic career positions include geologist, Dean of Arts and Sciences, Vice President of Academic Affairs, Futurist, and InDr. Elisa Robyn, a modern-day Renaissance educator and leader, is the author of The Way of the Well, a spiritual romance, and Pirate Wisdom, lessons in leadership. Her eclectic career positions include geologist, Dean of Arts and Sciences, Vice President of Academic Affairs, Futurist, and Innovative Mojo Coach. Currently, Elisa is an executive director at Regis University. She holds a Masters degree from the University of California, Santa Barbara, and a Ph.D. from the University of Colorado, Boulder. Her most current writings can be found atnovative Mojo Coach. Currently, Elisa is an executive director at Regis University. She holds a Masters degree from the University of California, Santa Barbara, and a Ph.D. from the University of Colorado, Boulder. Her most current writings can be found atDr. Elisa Robyn, a modern-day Renaissance educator and leader, is the author of The Way of the Well, a spiritual romance, and Pirate Wisdom, lessons in leadership. Her eclectic career positions include geologist, Dean of Arts and Sciences, Vice President of Academic Affairs, Futurist, and Innovative Mojo Coach. Currently, Elisa is an executive director at Regis University. She holds a Masters degree from the University of California, Santa Barbara, and a Ph.D. from the University of Colorado, Boulder. Her most current writings can be found at

/Source

Elisa Robyn

Dr. Elisa Robyn, a modern-day Renaissance educator and leader, is the author of The Way of the Well, a spiritual romance, and Pirate Wisdom, lessons in leadership. Her eclectic career positions include geologist, Dean of Arts and Sciences, Vice President of Academic Affairs, Futurist, and Innovative Mojo Coach. Currently, Elisa is an executive director at Regis University. She holds a Masters degree from the University of California, Santa Barbara, and a Ph.D. from the University of Colorado, Boulder.

What Is Passion and Do I Still Have It? by Shelley Anderson

What is Passion and Do I Still Have It

We get so caught up in day to day minutia that I believe we sometimes forget why we love what we do. Can you think back to that time when you couldn’t wait to get to work? Remember being so excited that you got to work early and stayed late? Talking later to your friends about the newest of it all?

I recently made a friend who reminded me of myself a long time ago — when everything I was doing was fresh and new and exciting, and my joy in greeting each day was palpable. Over a cup of coffee his enthusiasm for life was infectious! After we parted I found myself grinning from ear to ear and shaking my head at the same time.

There was a little bit of naivety in his musings, but at the same time I couldn’t stop thinking about the thrill he was getting from each new discovery on his journey. Some of the times I have felt this type of excitement were: preparing for a big day like my wedding, having a baby, singing at the Kennedy Center in DC, hearing the laughter of small children, meeting someone for the first time that I have respected my whole life, falling in love, working on a political campaign and the pride I felt when they won. I am sure you have your own moments that have felt special and can relate.

So where did our passion for our jobs and life in general go? Why are we so often just going through the motions? Perhaps we have forgotten what passion really means. Have you ever thought that what you do every day makes a difference to the people around you? I’m not just talking about your work environment, but everyone you meet or are in contact with.

My sense is that we block out and tend to forget that we DO make a difference with every smile (or sneer), hug (or rejection), look (or stare). You matter! What you do, feel, think, and say matter. And what is passion? It’s PASS-I-ON. Every time you bring excitement or a sense of newest to whatever you are doing, you are leaving a little bit more of the real, authentic YOU there. You are passing “you” on.

That’s what my friend did. His love of life stayed with me the rest of the day, and is here now as I write these words. What a wonderful gift. We all have that gift. We gift who we are at every moment. So how are you living your passion today?

 Author, lecturer and former Personal Assistant of Louise Hay Shelley is on a constant quest to uncover the truth and make it accessible to all of us. She lives as a progressive pioneer.

Author, lecturer and former Personal Assistant of Louise Hay Shelley is on a constant quest to uncover the truth and make it accessible to all of us. She lives as a progressive pioneer.

Not Everything Happens for a Reason By Dr. Elisa Robyn

The thump on my head was sudden and unexpected. I was walking through the park and thought I had been hit on the head by a branch. The blow caused me to stagger and, I admit, shriek a bit, but it did not knock me out. I grabbed my head and glanced behind me to see if there was someone there, and to find out what had collided with my head. But within a second it was clear that the staggering squirrel in front of me was the culprit. He was a bit off balance, and obviously regaining his footing. He turned and looked at me, chewed me out, and ran up the tree next to me. I had been hit in the head by a falling squirrel, who was blaming me for the encounter. A squirrel was scapegoating me for his own awkward imbalance.

 Luckily I was wearing a hat and had my sweatshirt hood pulled up over my head. After checking my head for damage, of which there was none, and having a moment’s worry about the possibility of squirrel-cussion, I headed home wondering what to make of this experience. Was this a targeted attack? Was it a random squirreling event? Or was it possibly the start of some larger and more sinister squirrel terrorism? 

And of course, because this was just so odd, I wondered if this was a common occurrence. An internet search on “squirrel hitting a person in the head” revealed several other head-seeking squirrel events, but they were by no means common. And of course, none of those people had any Intel about what the event meant. The search also resulted in interpretations of squirrel dreams, but none about dreams with squirrel-head encounters. And finally, there was great discourse on the spiritual meaning of squirrels as power animals. 

I might as well have been reading about the trickster, coyote. According to the experts, squirrels can be telling me that I am hoarding old emotions, situations or problems, or that I need to hold on to things that have meaning to me. On the other hand, it might be that I need to have more fun, or conversely, be more focused and persistent. Then again, perhaps a project or relationship that I have been working on is about to come to fruition, or perhaps those same ventures or relationships are failed efforts and I need to walk away. 

By the end of the day, I had shared the story with several friends in a stand-up comedic style, joking about an impending squirrel-apocalypse, and cautioning everyone to wear bike helmets when near trees. Perhaps this was a variation on one of the ten plagues, or the Hitchcock movie “The Birds.” There had to be a meaning, because EVERYTHING happens for a reason, right? 

At best, it depends. Yes, there was a reason the squirrel fell out of the tree. It was a misjudged jump. Yes, there was a reason that he hit my head. I was right there. Was there some deep spiritual reason for me to discern when those events collided? Probably not. Not everything that happens around me is about me. Not everything that happens to me carries deep mystical insight. Of obviously my choices and actions cause events. If I do not fill up my car with gas, I will eventually run dry and be stranded. But in this world not every “what” has a personal “why.” Some things happen because we are humans on a crowded planet.  

Maybe , in this case, I just need to paraphrase Freud; sometimes a squirrel hitting you in the head is just a squirrel with bad balance. 

elisa_blog_lg.jpg

Dr. Elisa Robyn, a modern-day Renaissance educator and leader, is the author of The Way of the Well, a spiritual romance, and Pirate Wisdom, lessons in leadership. Her eclectic career positions include geologist, Dean of Arts and Sciences, Vice President of Academic Affairs, Futurist, and Innovative Mojo Coach. Currently, Elisa is an executive director at Regis University. She holds a Masters degree from the University of California, Santa Barbara, and a Ph.D. from the University of Colorado, Boulder. Her most current writings can be found at

/Source

Elisa Robyn

Dr. Elisa Robyn, a modern-day Renaissance educator and leader, is the author of The Way of the Well, a spiritual romance, and Pirate Wisdom, lessons in leadership. Her eclectic career positions include geologist, Dean of Arts and Sciences, Vice President of Academic Affairs, Futurist, and Innovative Mojo Coach. Currently, Elisa is an executive director at Regis University. She holds a Masters degree from the University of California, Santa Barbara, and a Ph.D. from the University of Colorado, Boulder.